Industrial Applications of Lubricants

Lubricants are used within many industries, from automotive to food production. Here are some most common reasons for using them.

To Reduce Friction

This is a well-known use of lubricants, within both domestic and industrial applications. It helps machines to operate successfully, and prolongs the life of affected parts by preventing the wear and tear that would be caused by surface-to-surface friction.

To Reduce Contamination

Some machines, particular within the automotive industry, may generate contaminants or unwanted fragments. In these situations, lubricants help to remove these waste particles, transporting them to a filter where they can be removed. To assist with the reduction of contamination, lubricants used for this purpose will often use detergent additives.

To Protect Against Corrosion

When certain industrial components are exposed to moisture and oxygen, particularly iron and steel parts, corrosion can occur. This is one of the greatest costs for manufacturing companies, and replacing corroded parts can be expensive. In many cases, corrosion can be reduced or prevented by the appropriate use of lubricants.

To Prevent Wear and Tear

Even when machinery components appear smooth, they actually tend to be coarse and uneven, with protruding peaks that cause damage when they rub against adjacent surfaces. This friction leads to wear and tear on each of the parts. When both parts are sufficiently lubricated, this damage is greatly reduced, prolonging the lifespan of the equipment.

To Keep Moving Parts Separate

Moving parts exist in most industrial systems, and it’s necessary to ensure they are sufficiently lubricated to guarantee safety and efficiency. When moving parts touch they are more prone to wear and tear and, consequently, heat generation. In some applications, this can be dangerous, so using lubricants is a top priority. The lubricants act as a barrier between two moving parts, enabling them to move freely and independently.